Beginning In the Beginning

Artists Mel and Miriam Alexenberg celebrated their 52nd year of marriage by collaborating on the "Torah Tweets" blogart project. During each of the 52 weeks of their 52nd year, they posted six photographs reflecting their life together with a tweet text that relates the weekly Torah reading to their lives.

Unlike the biblical narrative that begins “In the Beginning,” a blog begins at the end. A blog displays its narrative in reverse chronological order with the most recent post appearing first. This blog was created to reverse the order of the blog posts in the “Torah Tweets” blog to begin in the beginning.

The Alexenbergs invite other couples, individuals, and families to join them celebrating their lives through creating their own spiritual blog.


Monday, January 27, 2014

Genesis 8: The Spirit of Amalek in Germany

Vayishlah/Sent (Genesis 32:4-36:43)

Rescue me, please, from the hand of my brother, from the hand of Esau, for I fear him lest he come and kill us all, mother and children alike…. Jacob went to Sukkot….  Esau was the ancestor the Edomites.  (Genesis 32:12,17,43)
Remember what [the Edomite tribe] Amalek did to you on your way out of Egypt.  When they encountered you on the way and struck those of you who were weak and lagging behind when you were weary and exhausted. (Deuteronomy 25:17,18)


The spirit of Amalek rises up in every generation to murder Jews because they are Jews from the time of the Exodus to the Persian Haman.
And to the Spanish Inquisition to the Russian pogroms to the Holocaust orchestrated by Hitler with Germany efficiency.

Arising once more in Persia today as Iran develops nuclear weapons to wipe Israel off the map.
Germany is promoting a second Holocaust by doing billions of dollars’ worth of business with Iran despite international sanctions.

The week of Vayishlah, Mel was keynote speaker at a symposium on Postdigital Narrative Art at Germany's ZKM Center for Art and Media.
Mel's presentation focusing on this blog was presented in a huge building that was formerly Hitler's torpedo factory in Karlsruhe.

In the 1200's, Munich's Jews were herded into the synagogue and burnt to death.  In the 1700's, Munich authorities made it illegal to build a sukkah.
For Sky Art '83, Mel built a sukkah at the entrance to the BMW Museum in Munich that was attacked by a neo-Nazi motorcycle gang.

Although they failed to destroy the sukkah, they smashed the table holding earth from Israel that had cast its shadow on the sukkah floor.
The scattered earth was swept up.  Mel spread it on the grass at the site of Hitler's death camp in Dachau.

He wrote from multiple viewpoints the word sukkah with Hebrew letters constructed from rebar rods discarded at a building site.

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